DIY Waterdrop Solar Lights | Step-by-step tutorial for DIY waterdrop solar lights | Upcycled candle sticks | Upcycled plant watering globes | DIY whimsical garden lights | #TheNavagePatch #DIY #Upcycled #SolarLights | Easy, budget friendly DIY backyard ornaments and landscape lights | TheNavagePatch.com

DIY Waterdrop Solar Lights

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DIY Waterdrop Solar Garden Lights will bring some magic to your garden and look incredible when the sun goes down!

Are you looking for the perfect addition to your garden?

Something that will really make a statement and stand out from the crowd?

waterdrop solar light in a garden at night

Then you’re going to want to make some of these DIY waterdrop solar lights!

Interested?

Good! I’ll show you how!

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A Different Kind of Solar Garden Light…

You’d be surprised to learn how easy and quick it was to make these beautiful waterdrop solar lights. But before going into the tutorial, let me tell you how this little project started. Early one Saturday morning, I went to our basement, and as usual, I started going through my never-ending stash of junk and useless stuff. But this time, my purpose was to gather some of that junk we would never use and take it to Put & Take – for the first time ever!

I know, right? That doesn’t sound like me at all! Greg’s jaw hit the floor when he discovered what I was up too, LOL!

So I was really into clearing out our basement, and the first couple of things I found suitable for Put & Take were these useless watering globes I bought a couple of years ago.

Two glass watering globes on a carpet.

I say “useless” because they never worked for us. Every time I tried them with a house plant, the plant would die, while these little buggers sat there, stuck in the dirt and full of water. [In their defense, she kills every house plant she tries to care for πŸ™‚ -Greg]

They were a constant reminder of wasted money, and they really deserved to be left at Put & Take! Greg was delighted seeing me there gathering stuff for Put & Take. After all, I never get rid of anything ever πŸ˜‰ [Ever. Ever. Ever -Greg] But a few minutes later, my babes brought me a cup of coffee. Believe it or not, with the first few sips of that heavenly brew, my worldview changed, and not only did I stop what I was doing, but I also asked Greg to take to me to Home Depot to buy  two hose bibs. hahahaha :-D. Can you picture the look on Greg’s face right at that moment? Oh yes…it was priceless!! LOL. [We were this close to actually throwing something away! Curses! Drat! Foiled again! -Greg]

DIY solar light in a garden at night

Once we were back from Home Depot, I gathered all the supplies for this project.

DIY Waterdrop Solar Lights

SUPPLIES LIST

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DIY Waterdrop Solar Lights - TheNavagePatch.com
An assortment of materials needed for this project.

DIY Waterdrop Solar Lights Tutorial

I started by screwing the 1/2 inch 90 degree elbow onto the 1/2 inch black pipe nipple.

A piece of black pipe and a 90 degree elbow.

Then, I unscrewed the handle from the hose bib. This was to ease my job while pulling the lights through the hose bib.

a pair of pliers opening a hose bib

Next, I started pulling the string lights, first through the black pipe and then through the hose bib.

pulling fairy lights through black pipe and hose bib.

Once I pulled all the lights through the hose bib and reached the cable, I screwed the hose bib into the pipe.

hose bib with lights being screwed onto black pipe.

Now it was time for the most tedious part of the project: filling the watering globe with string lights. But even that didn’t take longer than 10 minutes. πŸ˜‰ I know, right? I wasn’t lying when I said it was a really easy and quick project! Considering how beautiful it turns out in the end, that little time spent on these lights was totally worth it πŸ™‚

fairly lights inserted into neck of glass watering globe.

Once I filled the watering globe with a good amount of lights, I started coiling the rest of the lights around a very thin dowel. You see, the string lights I had were 33 ft long and had 100 LED lights – meaning that only every 4 inches there was a LED light. So to place enough lights also in the neck of the watering globe, I had to shorten that 4 inches. And the easiest way to do that was coiling the lights πŸ˜‰

After coiling the rest of the string lights, I pushed those coils into the neck portion of the watering globe.

solar fairy lights wound around a rod and then inserted into watering globe.

Now that I was happy with the amount of lights in the neck of the watering globe, I tested the lights to see if all the connections were good.

Woman testing the solar lights
light-filled watering globe, black pipe and hose bib not yet connected

After seeing that everything was functioning as they should be, I moved on to the next step.

I pulled the gasket off of the bib handle and screwed the handle back into its place. Here is an important note here: before screwing the handle back in make sure you position it to “open,” otherwise it could hurt the wire of your string lights.

gasket being removed from brass hose bib

Next, I was going to connect the watering globe to the hose bib. Since I wasn’t sure if hot glue would hurt the copper of the string lights or not, I opted for my handy dandy apoxie sculpt. If you can’t find apoxie sculpt, Sugru or any other moldable glue could also work for this part.

I took equal small amounts from each part of the apoxie sculpt and mixed them until it was ready to be worked with.

fingers mixing Apoxie Sculpt epoxy.

I put the apoxie sculpt mixture around the opening of the watering globe and connected the watering globe with the hose bib. Next, I propped the whole thing until I was happy with it’s appearance and let the apoxie sculpt cure overnight in that propped position.

attaching watering globe to hose bib with apoxie sculpt

The next morning, I spray painted the dried apoxie sculpt with  Rust-Oleum metallic antique brass spray paint.

nearly-completed waterdrop solar light

After the paint dried, I put the entire thing together with the help of hot glue. Normally 1/2 inch black pipe sits in a tapered candle holder pretty good. But I wanted more of a snug fit, so I put a little bit of hot glue to the front side of the pipe and placed the pipe into the candle holder.

attaching the base of the waterdrop light with hot glue

As the final step, I cut some wire and tidied the lights’ cord as seen in the pictures below. This last step is optional, but trust me, your DIY waterdrop solar lights will look much better with the cord tidied πŸ˜‰

base of light with wire running down the side

DIY Waterdrop Solar Garden Lights

Are you ready for the beauty shots? Ok then, let me warn you: I again put quite a lot of final photos! But this time it is to give you a better idea how our DIY waterdrop solar garden lights look all throughout the day & night, so yes the photos are all in different lighting πŸ˜‰

DIY Waterdrop Solar Light in a garden during the day
closeup of solar garden light in a garden during the day
side view of waterdrop garden light in a garden during the day

This is how they look in the early evening hours (when the solar garden lights just turned on):

Side view of two DIY Solar Garden Lights in a garden at dusk
side view of one solar garden light in a garden at dusk
side view of a waterdrop solar light in a garden at dusk

Then later in the evening, when it is a tad darker…

side view of two solar garden lights in a garden at night
solar garden light next to a hosta
waterdrop solar light next to a hosta at night

And well into the night…

side view of solar garden light at night next to a hosta
closeup of waterdrop solar light next to a plant at night

I really love our DIY waterdrop solar lights, and I hope you liked them too!

Handan, xo

Here are some more Garden Decor and Lighting ideas for you!

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DIY Waterdrop Solar Lights - TheNavagePatch.com
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200 Comments

  1. Oh handan…this is just awesome! YOU are awesome! I LOVE this ,I think, more than anything else you all have done…but then I would have to think about it again. You both have done some great things. I am a light and bling person so this went straight to my ❀️. And…. you know the names of all this stuff. My husband doesn’t even know what stuff is called. He makes up names!
    If I saw this in a craft fair…yup I would be buying it! My heroine! Way to go!???

    1. Oh thank you so much, Bernice! That is your kindness!! I too love light and a little bit of bling – especially in the garden. I also made another garden light which I’m in the process of preparing the tutorial for it. I am sure you’ll like that one as well. That one is not really one of a kind like these guys, but still looks great in a garden πŸ˜‰

      1. Wow! What a beautiful project. Your instructions are the best I’ve ever seen. And I’ve seen a lot of them. I also have one of those glass globes that never worked. I’m going to turn it into a beautiful piece of art for my yard, thanks to you.

        1. Oh thank you so much for your lovely comment, Gloria! I am so glad you found the tutorial easy to understand. Please send us a photo or two when you finish your lights. I would to feature it on our Facebook page! πŸ™‚

        2. I love garden solar lights and this one is amazing! I really enjoy your tutorial. You make it fun and easy to understand with great detail. Thank you so much for sharing

      2. I love this project it’s so beautiful, but one thing where can I get the tiny solar lights at. I have no idea where to buy them.

    2. I made this project and I love it. I was wondering where to put it where it could be seen. After thinking, I came up with 2 additional ideas to make this even more spectacular (if that can be done). I have a bird bath in the back and I thought it would be cool to make this taller (with galvanized pipe) so it looks like a large drop of water going into the bird bath. Then I thought I could also put another string of waterproof lights inside the bird bath to make it even more beautiful. I haven’t finished the project yet, but I cannot wait!!

      1. That is a fantastic idea, Digna! It definitely can be made taller by using either galvanized pipe or black pipe. Please send a picture or two for me to see how your project turned out as I would love to see it! πŸ™‚

    3. The water globes look so much larger in the pics,are they the 12 ” or are they larger,if so could you give me a link as to where to find them?

      1. Hi Judy, I am just seeing you comment, so sorry for not getting back to you sooner. The water globes are are not larger than 12″. So you should be good with the ones you have πŸ™‚

    4. Love it! I have used these plant bulb to water my plants for years,
      My plants are doing really well over watering kills plants. I just refill
      When there empty.

  2. Wowza! I was so impressed with the watering pail with the gems (and I still love it!) but this is amazing! I love it! You are so creative and innovative! Congrats on quitting smoking! That perhaps, is the best part of this post despite your gorgeous light!

    1. Thank you so much, Giselle! Oh yeah…After 10+ years it wasn’t easy, but finally I did it.

      By the way, I made something similar to that pail, but this time lights are coming out of the spout instead of the gems. I will be sharing that one also soon, but because I really love these waterdrop ones I gave them the priority. Also these guys are unique – meaning that I haven’t seen anything like them even on pinterest πŸ˜‰ Hence I didn’t want to miss the chance for them to be the first of their kind on the whole world wide web! πŸ˜€

  3. These are so beautiful! You’re like a genuis visionary with all the junk in your basement! Amazing job!

    1. Thank you very much Tammy! They are beautiful, aren’t they? I am indeed so happy with these guys as they gave that bling our side yard needed πŸ˜‰

  4. My son-in-law is in the process of landscaping and decorating their whole yard. I think he might even consider adding such a fun but beautiful display that is particularly stunning at night! Can I forward your tutorial to him by email?

    1. Oh thank you so much, Nancy! Of course you can! In fact, I would love to see more of these lights being made and used, because they are really so beautiful and every yard deserves one πŸ˜‰

  5. Wow! Handan, you hit another one outta the park (or garden)!!! I am so enamored with these garden decorations. They are absolutely gorgeous. And you know how I love a good repurposed project. Can’t wait to put several of these waterdrop lights in my backyard. Looking forward to seeing your other creations.

    1. Susan, thank you so much! They are beautiful, aren’t they? Oh you can’t believe how I was annoyed with those watering globes as I hate wasting money. Luckily I was able to give them a way better purpose, so now they well deserve the dollars I paid for them πŸ˜‰

  6. WOW…..This is the first time I have seen or been on your Blog. First of all, I love the Waterdrop Solar Lights and I too have some of those globes, which I now have a project for. I think your Blog is amazing, I love it. I love that you and your husband work together on here. Your projects are awesome. So very glad I landed on here and will be a regular visitor. Thank you

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comment, Donna! Greg and I are so glad you like The Navage Patch and the projects we do. Since you are new to the Patch, let me tell you: Greg is the funny one! Funny as in “you don’t want to take the risk of drinking anything while you are reading his DIY posts.” If you read his Behind The Scenes post [ https://www.thenavagepatch.com/behind-scenes-navage-patch/ ] you will see what I mean. That one is my favorite so far. β€Š
      Thanks again for your lovely comment, and have a great day!

  7. Very cool! I can never get rid of anything, either. Glad you found a use for your watering bulbs! I never would have thought to turn them into lights.

  8. Oh Handan ,you are so clever they are beautiful ! I have some of these globes lurking in the shed unused,now i know what to do with them, thank you ! But they will have to wait ,it is our village fete on Saturday so i am busy making things to sell on my hedgehog rescue fundraising stall.

    1. Catherine, thank you so much for such a sweet comment! When you get to doing your waterdrop lights make sure you send a picture or two, so we can feature it on our Facebook page πŸ˜‰
      Good luck with the fundraiser!

    2. Hello,
      This might sound crazy. But…for a fee…do you ever make these for customers?

      And…….does it get plugged into a socket?

      Thanks

      1. Hi Barbra, it doesn’t sound crazy at all! Unfortunately, we don’t make and sell our projects because we simply don’t have the time. The blog keeps us going 7 days a week all year round! πŸ™‚

  9. Using garage sale table lamps, you can run the lights through the inside and out the cord hole. I am so fascinated with this idea!

  10. This is so beautiful! Can you tell me where you got that candlestick? I’m having a hard time finding anything similar and I would love to make one of these!

    1. Hi Elizabeth,

      I bought my candle holders at a tag sale. I can’t remember exactly, but knowing myself I wouldn’t pay more then 5 dollars for both. You can try craigslist or ebay…or better yet, try tag sales in your area – I am sure you can find it much cheaper than you can on craigslist or ebay.

      If you can’t find tapered candle stick, here is another thought: you can use 10-12 inch black pipe instead of the black pipe nipple I used. But then, you’ll also need to use a 1/2 inch floor flange (something like this: http://amzn.to/2rzaVY8) so you can stand it on a flat surface. Now that said if it tends to tip over due to weight of the watering globes, you can use 4 tent spikes (something like these: http://amzn.to/2tvqlcj) to hold that flange in place in your garden…or you can make a bigger base and screwing the floor flange on that bigger base πŸ˜‰

      I hope this info helps!

      When you finish making one, I would love you to send a picture or two of your waterdrop solar lights, so we can feature it on our Facebook page! πŸ™‚

      1. Instead of using a flange couldn’t you just leave the pipe open at bottom and pound a piece of rebar in the ground and slip the pipe over it? Wouldn’t tip at all. I do the rebar thing for my glass garden flowers. Thanks for this idea–I bought a pipe with faucet piece at a tag sale (garage/yard sale) and this is a great idea for it–plus I have the watering globe too since I have killed every plant I have ever owned…lol

        1. Oh yes, definitely that is much easier! LOL – me too. If it wasn’t for Greg’s care (my hubs), no house plants would survive in our house!

  11. Totally in love with these. You have such a creative mind and actually know and have the desire to put it in to practice!! I just have one question. Where did you hide the battery pack?

    1. Thank you so much Jackie! These are solar lights, so there is a solar panel instead of a battery pack, and I placed those solar panels right by the day lilies next to the waterdrop solar lights. πŸ™‚

  12. Beautiful! One question: The light cord looked like it went through the black pipe in the first pictures. Later when gluing that pipe to the candlestick, the cord was not there. Where does that end come out?

    1. Thank you so much, Carol! The cord comes out from the end of that black pipe. If you take a look at the second β€œbeauty shot”, you can see the cord right at beginning of the candle holder (or at the area where pipe ends).
      I hope this info helps! πŸ™‚

      1. Thank you so much for responding! Wow! πŸ™‚ I just wondered how the cord doesn’t get pinched or cut when putting the black pipe into the candlestick. Maybe the candlestick is wider?

        1. You are welcome, Carol! Yes, the candle holder is slightly wider. Hence I used the hot glue to tighten the fit in a snugger way. So between the hot glue thickness and the cord thickness, the pipe and the entire top stays in place, but without hurting the cord. πŸ™‚

          1. Why not just start with feeding the lights up through the candle stick then through the pipe and spout; you would only lose wire the length of the black pipe?

  13. Your lights are the prettiest I have seen in a long time, and your tutorial is awesome. Thank you for showing us your lovely lights. Think I will visit the second hand stores and see what I can come up with.

    1. Thank you so much, Doreen! I am so glad you liked the tutorial! Please do send a picture or two when you finish your lights, so we can feature it on our Facebook page πŸ™‚

  14. I love these, you have a wonderfully creative mind. My one concern is them falling over and breaking. How strong are the globes? Thanks

    1. Thank you so much, Kathy! They are just like any other glass object, meaning that if you dropped them on a tile floor or stone ground there is a probability that they will break. But if you are keeping them in your garden, or happen to drop them on soil ground, then the glass shouldn’t break. If you are also wondering how strong would be the connection point with the apoxie sculpt, then I have say it is pretty strong. Apoxie sculpt is a really good material that I trust with many resin or clay repair work. I hope this info helps πŸ™‚

  15. This is just fabulous!!!!!!! Can’t wait to make it. Easy enough I can do it. Can’t wait to look at your other projects. Thank you!!!!!

    1. Thank you so much, Diana! Oh it is really easy and you are going to love how it looks in your garden! Yes, please do check out our other projects as I am sure you will like them πŸ™‚

  16. My neighbor and I have bought the things needed to make this lamp and plan to do it later this week. My question is this: Eventually the solar lights will die. Will we be able to remove the lights and replace them with new ones?

    1. Hello Debbie, I am so glad you will be trying this easy and awesome project. I am sure you’ll enjoy every minute of it!
      As for your question, after a time the solar lights shouldn’t die (LED lights last for decades), but the rechargeable batteries might…or the solar panel may get old and stop charging. Either way, I would rather change the solar panel or the solar batteries instead of changing the lights – in other words, if it happened to my lights, then I would just buy another set of lights, cut the solar panel off it and splice it to the existing lights. But before doing that, I would try to see if changing the rechargeable batteries would help or not.
      I hope this info helps! πŸ™‚

      1. Thanks! We’ll try and post a pic of our lights when we’re finished. Hopefully it won’t be a pinterest “fail!”

  17. These are SO pretty! I have got to try this. I only have a small patio on my apartment, but 1 or 2 of these with a few potted plants would be wonderful. I wonder if they make these little lights with a “chase” feature. Like you see on Christmas light decorations. That would make it look like the “water” was actually running.

    1. Oh thank you so much! I know the lights that I gave the link to doesn’t have the chase feature. But I know some of the “8 mode” solar string lights on amazon have that feature. I have to say that is a fantastic idea and I should have bought my lights with that feature. It would look awesome!! πŸ™‚

  18. The directions never showed or told what you are to do with actual solar panel. Please tell & show pictures. Thanks.

    1. Hello Deb, I placed those solar panels right by the day lilies next to the waterdrop solar lights. Since the cord is long enough, you can place solar panel anywhere that would allow it to see sunlight.
      I hope this info helps! πŸ™‚

  19. This is so awesome! I saw some of the watering tubes in my daughters garage last week. I am so going to steal them,maybe I will take one of the finished ones back to her………maybe

  20. These are gorgeous. Gotta try myself. Where did you find the solar led light string? Having a problen with those.
    LOVE it!!

  21. They are very beautiful! But they look “top heavy” how do u keep them from falling over? And u gave me an idea! I have a “gazing ball” its hollow colored glass, green with a swirl of blue and white, u can see through it, it’s pretty but not very xciting, kno what I mean? So what m gonna do is remove the “neck coller”and put LED lights in it! Then put the “cap/coller” back on! I can’t wait to c how it turns out!

    1. Thank you so much, Anita! I indeed don’t do anything special to keep them from falling over. The tapered candle holders I have are heavy enough to keep the whole thing standing up. Also the (black pipe) nipple fits perfectly into the tapered candle holders. Hence the top part has no place to move.
      Oh yes!..I can imagine how lovely your gazing ball will look!!

  22. How do you get the wire from NOT being pinched when connecting the end of faucet fixture to the candle stick?

    1. Hi Denise, it is because I use the hot glue for the front part of the pipe, it has a snugger fit – meaning that I don’t have to forcefully push the pipe entirely down which could hurt the wire. πŸ™‚

  23. Your finished project was just beautiful. Have some of those water globes sitting in storage. Now I know what to do with them. Was wondering the number of lights on your strand of solar lights? Want to make this for my daughter and daughter-in-law for Christmas presents.

      1. Thank you so much for the quick reply. Am going to order my lights now and get a head start on lovely Christmas presents.

        1. Good luck on your project, Valerie! And please do send one or two pictures of your completed lights, so we can feature it on our Facebook page πŸ™‚

  24. Absolutely gorgeous! I’ve had those waterfront for years and didn’t know what to do with them. They’re so pretty I didn’t want to throw them out.
    Now I have a beautiful way to repurpose them.
    Where did you find the metal candle holder and how told does it need to be?

    1. Thank you so much, Anne De! Haha – same here: those globes are so very pretty, hence I couldn’t throw them away either πŸ™‚
      I bought my candle holders at a tag sale. Craigslist or ebay also have candlesticks galore, but I would first give tag sales a try, as I am sure they would be much cheaper at a tag sale than they are on craigslist or ebay.
      As for the heights: one of my tall candlesticks was about 1-2 inches taller than the watering globes. But if you look at the pictures, you’ll see one of the candlesticks isn’t as tall. Hence I used 2 different sized nipples. And that is what you can do – if your candlestick isn’t taller than your watering globe you can use a taller black pipe nipple.
      Also if you can’t find tapered candle holder, here is another idea you can use: get 10-12 inch black pipe instead of the black pipe nipple I used and also get a 1/2 inch floor flange (something like this: http://amzn.to/2rzaVY8) so you can stand your lights on a flat surface. Now that said, if the whole thing tends to tip over due to weight of the watering globes, you can use 4 tent spikes (something like these: http://amzn.to/2tvqlcj) to hold that flange in place in your garden…or you can make a bigger base and screwing the floor flange on that bigger base if you want to use at home.
      I hope this info helps! πŸ™‚

  25. I also have the plant watering globes sitting here, hardly used, and the spigot, but I am going to use an old lamp base and pole instead of candlestick. that way the cord can run right thru it . cant wait to make it I love reused items made into treasures. first visit to your spot, really like it and will wait patiently for the waterdrop pail I think that was mentioned.

  26. Hello! New to your page but absolutely love this project! Can’t wait to make a few and give some to my mom! One quick question…..how tall is the candle holder you used? I’ve been looking around but haven’t found anything that will work yet. Thanks so much!

    1. Hi Jamie! Thank you so much for your lovely comment, and I hope you liked what you’ve seen so far on The Navage Patch!
      One of my tall candlesticks was about 1-2 inches taller than the watering globes. But if you look at the pictures, you’ll see one of the candlesticks isn’t as tall. Hence I used 2 different sized nipples. And that is what you can do – if your candlestick isn’t taller than your watering globe you can use a taller black pipe nipple.
      Also if you can’t find tapered candle holder, here is another idea you can use: get 10-12 inch black pipe instead of the black pipe nipple I used and also get a 1/2 inch floor flange (something like this: http://amzn.to/2rzaVY8) so you can stand your lights on a flat surface. Now that said, if the whole thing tends to tip over due to weight of the watering globes, you can use 4 tent spikes (something like these: http://amzn.to/2tvqlcj) to hold that flange in place in your garden…or you can make a bigger base and screwing the floor flange on that bigger base if you want to use at home.
      I hope this info helps! πŸ˜‰

  27. Hello. I love this. Want to make for mother in law for her birthday next week. Is there anyway to print out instructions ? Or possibly email them to me? That would be awesome if so. Thank you.

  28. Found you on Hometalk and just had to share this cool idea of yours on Facebook!! I will have to increase the size of the base because of the wind where I live, but you may have just inspired me to actually do something with my garden because I NEED some of these on the farm!!!

    1. Thank you so much for visiting us! and thank you for sharing it, so others can also see these lights and give them a try πŸ˜‰
      If the place you live is very windy you might want to try ground stakes: in other words, instead of using a black pipe nipple use a 12 inch or 18 inch black pipe and make your lights like that. Then once you finish your lights, just hammer a small rebar or stake into the ground, and slide the black pipe onto that rebar/stake. That way no wind could hurt your lights πŸ˜‰

  29. There is very little for me to say, because so many of your followers has spoken for me. This design is fabulous. I love everything about. The way it shows it’s beauty during the day, and it’s clever fabulousiness during the night. Thank you for sharing

  30. Ok so I’m a bit slow when it comes to making things like these globes but oh how I really want to try..I just need to understand one small thing.. these are lit up by solar only right ? There is no electricity that needs to be hooked to them ? Cause I don’t do electricity lol… I’d shock myself to death for sure lol..ty in advance ..

    1. Hi Vickie, I made these waterdrop lights using solar string lights. So no worries – this DIY project is really safe and easy πŸ˜‰

    1. Thank you so much! As for your question: not really, because between the cord, pipe and the hot glue there is not really much space for rain to find it’s way and fill the candle holder. But if you were to hose it down continuously, then yes it could fill it with water. That said, I am not sure if it would really matter at all as the lights are for outdoors, hence they are suitable for outdoor conditions. So unless somehow you break the cord’s plastic, that plastic cover of the cord wouldn’t be disintegrated just by being in water.
      I hope this info helps! πŸ™‚

  31. Wow! This is just amazing! They look like those acient mythology style, looks so elegent! The thing is I can not find mostly of the elements you shown, otherwise i would try to make right away!!
    Thanks for sharing, this is a great blog!

    1. Thank you so much! and sorry that I missed your awesome comment earlier. If you can’t find the supplies anywhere else, you might want to try ebay. Maybe you could find them there.

  32. Thank you so much for the idea and tutorial Handan!! I love “re-purposing” projects but have never really attempted anything on my own, but your easy to follow instructions with photos was calling to me! And as of this evening I finished my very first DIY project and I love the result!!

    1. Oh, that is such awesome news, Andrea! I am so glad you think the instructions were good πŸ™‚ The first project is always the hardest with DIYs, but then, once you start getting into it more and more, you’ll see everything else will be much easier πŸ˜‰ I am so happy to be able to inspire you. Can you send a picture of your finished project to me, so we can feature it on our facebook page?
      Have a great day, Andrea!

      1. It was definitely a bit of trial and error but I’m very happy with the result! My lights are battery powered and not solar because I had a hard time finding the right ones in my area, and they’re not as long as yours were but now that I know what I’m getting into, I’ll order other lights to get the real desired effect!

  33. These are just beautiful!!! I actually have a couple of the water globes (they didn’t work for me either!). I may even try to make some myself and will send a picture if I am successful. I imagine the candle stick have to be fairly heavy to hold up the spigot and globe?

    1. Thank you so much, Joy! I am sure yours will turn absolutely awesome. Mine was brass and it was pretty heavy, so it did hold everything together. But if the candle stick is heavy enough, you can also try a lamp base like other readers suggested πŸ˜‰

      And yes please do send a picture or two, so we can feature it on our Facebook page! πŸ™‚

  34. These are really beautiful. A couple of ideas for those of you who want to try this. You could use either black or galvanized pipe for this. Galvanized might be better it will not rust. I was not clear on how the wire was handled once it came out of the pipe when the pipe was placed in the candle holder but it seems that it was looped back up from the end of the pipe and over and down the side of the candle holder. I would bet that the candle holder is hollow and it might be possible to drill a hole through the top and feed the wire down through the stem. I would also bet that the base of the candle holder can be unscrewed from the stem so it should be possible to also run the wire down the candle holder and out the base.

    Can you suggest a place to obtain solar string lights? I have a ‘bottle” tree in my yard that I have wanted to light in this way.

    Thank you.

    1. Hello Rex,

      My candle holders were unfortunately one piece heavy brass. Hence I couldn’t drill into it. But yes, if it can be done that would be best way to hide the cord instead of snaking it around pipe like I did. Also some of our readers used lamp bases to make this light and their turned out also awesome! So there you go – another idea for all the creative souls out there πŸ˜‰

      Amazon has the string lights I used on this project. To be exact here is the link to the ones I used: http://amzn.to/2u8ciNd

      I thank you for reading and coming up with great ideas to improve the design πŸ˜‰

      Happy crafting!

  35. I have two of those exact same waterers , I can’t wait to do this I want to place them on my daughters grave site they will be so pretty and represent the size of the tears I have shed thank you for this I love them!!

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comment, Louann. I am truly sorry for your loss. Please let me know if you have any questions about the project and I will help you as best as I can.

  36. I have checked instructions and photos a couple of times, but I am still confused about where the wiring comes out of the plumbing because it does not go down through the candlestick.
    Thanks for your help.
    Meg

    1. Hello Meg, that is one of the most asked questions, hence I took the picture to show you how I snaked the cord. I hope this helps πŸ™‚

      DIY Waterdrop Solar Lights

      1. Can you tell me how tall the candlestick should be? I thought that would be the easiest piece to find, but I’m really having a hard time. So may have to use or find an old lamp base or pipe, but still need the height. Thanks !!

        1. Hello Arianna, if you can’t find candle stick you can use an old lamp base as some of our readers did. And I have to say they look so lovely and it is always easier to hide the cable with a lamp base.

          As for the height my tallest candle stick was 12 inch tall which is about 1-2 inches taller than the watering globes. But if you look at the pictures, you’ll see one of the candlesticks isn’t as tall. Hence I used 2 different sized nipples. And that is what you can do – if your candlestick isn’t taller than your watering globe you can use a taller black pipe nipple.

          Also if you can’t find tapered candle holder or lamp base, here is another idea you can use: get 10-12 inch black pipe instead of the black pipe nipple I used and also get a 1/2 inch floor flange (something like this: http://amzn.to/2rzaVY8) so you can stand your lights on a flat surface. Now that said, if the whole thing tends to tip over due to weight of the watering globes, you can use 4 tent spikes (something like these: http://amzn.to/2tvqlcj) to hold that flange in place in your garden…or you can make a bigger base and screwing the floor flange on that bigger base if you want to use at home.

          I hope this info helps! ?

  37. This is so lovely! However, some of the parts are not cheap at all, so it’s about a $75+ project. I’m using Styrofoam instead of the glue/adhesive connection. Still a beautiful idea!

    1. Thank you so much Marlene! But oh my – I hope you didn’t spend that much to make one, because it is really not a $75+ project even if you made it from scratch, meaning you had to buy everything.

      The best part of this project is you can substitute the candlesticks with an old lamp base or even a $4 black pipe. So overall your cost should be at most:
      – $8.50 for a set of lights (http://amzn.to/2hu5qp7),
      – $10 on a couple of brand new watering globes (http://amzn.to/2v3xunZ),
      – at most $10 for the pipes and hose bib (at Home Depot, Lowes or anyother local hardware store)
      – and include another $6 for the moldable glue (http://amzn.to/2htEiGK)

      With all that, your total should make approximately $35. That cost could go down if you were to find a second hand lamp base or candle stick and second hand watering globes.

      And if you made two of these lights your cost for each one would be even less, because you’d already have the second water globe on hand. Hence I was saying, I hope you didn’t really spend that much to make this water drop garden lights.

  38. Love the idea….however, you didn’t address where you mount the solar box. I don’t see it in the pictures and I’m not sure where this should be attached. Can you assist my perplexed mind? LOL

    1. Thank you so much, Brett! I placed those solar panels right by the day lilies next to the waterdrop solar lights. Since the cord is long enough, you can place solar panel anywhere that would allow it to see sunlight. So there is no mounting πŸ˜‰
      I hope this info helps! ?

  39. I have the parts to make two of these awesome lights. I am doing a “dry run” putting things together and using plain wire to see how it all fits. As I am running the wire through the hose bib it has a spot where it kind of crimps to get up to the level where it needs to feed into the elbow and nipple. I am concerned this may cause a problem with the wire for the light. Did you have to contend with a kink in the hose bib that is right where you turn it on and off? I have dismantled it as you did in the directions so it isn’t the handle causing the issue. Is there perhaps a different type of hose bib? Mine looks exactly like yours. Sorry so long but I wanted to give you all the info I could. Thank you and love this idea!

    1. Hi Jeanne, I encountered the same thing you did with the hose bib. But no worries once you thread the lights through everything works fine as long as you don’t turn off the faucet. Let me know how it went or if you have any other questions πŸ™‚

      1. I can NOT get the lights to go through the bible area. I even tried putting a stiffer wire and it still doesn’t work.

  40. Does n e one have painting oceans for the clear water globes I got for the waterdrop solar light Tutorial? I got clear ones by accident, also how did u paint the wires

    1. Hello Kristina,
      I think your best bet finding a tutorial about painting those water globes would be if you googled “how to paint glass Christmas ornaments”, because they are almost the same shape, just with a longer neck. As for the wires, I didn’t paint them. The wire part is clear plastic, so you can’t really see them. As for the copper wire where the lights are on, once you paint the watering globes, they won’t really show the wire.
      I hope this info helps πŸ™‚

  41. Loved this project only problem was feeding lights through hose bib..might want to mention that this is not the easy part.. if someone is new at this they dont realize it is up and over inside and over inside..takes a while..after that it isnt bad..love my finished project!!

    1. Thank you so much, Kelly! You are correct, the very first time of pulling the string lights through the hose bib can be quite difficult. But once you get it through, then it is just pulling the lights.
      I am so glad you love your finished waterdrop lights. If you can send us a picture, I would love to feature it on our Facebook page! πŸ™‚

  42. Almost ready to assemble! Since I live in Minnesota, I wanted to adore these beauties indoors during long winter months! I found a heavy brass ornate, steam-punk-ish lamp base on eBay! I’m going to use battery operated fairy lights on wire. My question is….if the light set dies, is there any way to replace the light string or even get them out? Should I consider something less permanent than epoxy or moldable glue in adhering the glass tube of the globe to the spicket? (So I can disassemble the piece, pull the dead lights out and replace them?) Any ideas? Many thanks!!!

    1. Hello Joanna,
      As these lights are LED they shouldn’t die too soon (LED lights generally last many years). So the only issue you might face could be related to the wire that is close to the battery pack or the battery pack itself. And if that ever happens you can always cut that wire out and splice a new one, or you can just change the battery pack.
      I hope this info helps πŸ™‚

  43. This would also be really neat made with a floor lamp base. The light would be higher and the cord could be strung inside the post.

    1. Oh absolutely, June! Some of our readers made it with lamp base to hide the cord better and sent the pictures to me. I have to say they all look fantastic! So yes, I would go for a lamp base instead of a candle stick πŸ˜‰

  44. I love these lights! I have bought many of these globes, not to use, just for color. It went together very quickly. Although, the sugary glue did not adhere to the metal. So, I’m awaiting the kind that you listed, hope that works! Love this project and I have enough globes to make some gifts and raffle items! Thank you!

  45. This is the most beautiful project ever!!!
    Btw, I owned a lot of these water globes and they do work ???.
    I’m definitely trying this project.

  46. Hi Handen, these are the most beautiful garden feature’s I have ever seen, you truly have a gift to picture these lovely gems in your mind. I couldnt help but wat to make some myself as gifts. After a month of gathering supplies I now have started my first. Getting through the bib is a little time consuming but so far it’s been well woth it. Cant wait to finish. Thank you so much for sharing your vision. My loved ones will enjoy them for years to come I’m sure and will love this garden gem as much as I do.

  47. Hey! I love this idea but I think I came up with another alternative. Instead of candle sticks, I used a lamp with a ” skinny ” base so I could feed the light wire down through it. Then I used a garden stake I pounded into the ground & slipped the lamp base down over the stake. This way the wind won’t blow it over. In this part of southern Idaho, the wind blows 90% of the time, so this was a must! Thanks for the great idea!!

    1. Hi Mariene, I’m so glad you used a lamp base, because some of our readers also used lamp bases for theirs lights and they say it works really great. But I have to say: the way you prevent it from blowing over is genius! Thank you for sharing that as I’ll be able to pass the info to others who are making these lights πŸ™‚

  48. Did not spend near the time you did on drip light. Yours really looks great but I had a worn out faucet and pipe and ran cord on outside since battery lights with timer built in was not long enough if I ran cord in or out. The tip that was fantastic was to wind lights around dowel for neck of drip. Looks GREAT.

  49. Very impressive and creative visual effects. The only part I would suggest changing is not using epoxy to attach vase to faucet. Instead, I would use a short piece of vinyl tubing available at HD or online. It can be heated to stretch over the size variations between faucet and vase. If you can find clear thermal shrink wire insulation of the right diameter that might even a better option. My biggest concern for the epoxy is the leverage the long vase has on the rigid connection and potential for damage to either epoxy (leakage) and or the vase.

    1. Thank you so much, Durwood! That is actually a great idea! I’ll check if I can find any clear shrink wire insulation that would fit. If I can find it, I’ll update the post by giving a second option for connection. I’m sure everyone will love that easy solution πŸ˜‰

  50. how does it keep from being tipped over in the wind?? does the pipe go all the way down into the ground, or would that be a way to keep it from b lowing over?

    1. Hi Jane, the candlestick I used is pretty heavy, so even on windy days, it doesn’t tip over. A big windstorm might knock it over, but we had taken it in for the season before the gusty storms in fall and winter. If where you live is really windy, then I suggest just using a longer pipe instead of a candle stick and putting that over a piece of rebar which is hammered in the ground.

    1. Hi Dora, I only made these two for our garden. But I’m sure you’d find this project really fun and easy if you’d like try to it. πŸ™‚

  51. Lovely…..I am online now looking for the materials need to accomplish this beautiful piece. I live in the Caribbean and this would fit quite beautifully in my ‘new garden’. I do how

    1. Can I purchase this size (1/2 in. x 2 in) black pipe?

    And again, this is beautiful. I will be sure to subscribe to your site to see other cool projects.

    Thanks,
    JayJay

    1. Hi JayJay, sorry for the late response. The length of the pipe really depends on how tall you want your light to be, hence I would say any length is good πŸ™‚ When you finish yours please send a picture or two on our facebook page, so we can share it with all of our readers!

  52. I love this and the watering can, I’ve ordered both sets of lights from Amazon last night, so excited to start some thrift shopping tomorrow.
    The only part I can’t figure out is where the cord comes out of the pipe end and you glued the pipe to candle stick. Where did the cord go,lol? Did you just bend it up the pipe and hot glue it? Doesn’t that pinch the cord or hot glue melt it??
    I did read about others using lamp poles, good ideal I might end up with that.
    BTW I found one of the globes I had in the attic 3 wks ago and tossed it in trash saying I don’t need this anymore bawaaaa lol

    1. Hi Traci, yes that’s exactly what I did: I just bent it up the pipe. But I didn’t put hot glue on or around the cord. I only hot glued the sides and the front and my cord is in the back. Also, the cord has a nice plastic cover, so it doesn’t get pinched or hurt when you bend it!
      LOL – that always happens to me! Always a day after throwing something out, I see something on internet and I go like “arrrggghhh – I knew I should have kept that!” LOL.

  53. Where can i find the solar lights? I’ve checked out the craft stores here. The do’nt know what I’m talking about. Help. Thank you. Alice

    1. Hi Dorothy, if you can’t find vintage candlesticks, you can use a metal lamp base instead. Some of our readers made these lights with metal lamp bases, and they look awesome! And as lamp bases would have a hallow middle, that would allow you to hide the cord even better πŸ˜‰

    1. Hi Shirlei, I’m afraid with that part of the project there is not much I can do to help. I know it’s tricky, but if you keep at it you should be able to get the wire through. Best of luck!

  54. Hi, did you have a problem with the lights tipping over? I had to fabricate the candlestick using a wood one and a pedestal glued together. I think it may be too light and tip over. Trying to figure out how to stake it or secure it to the ground.

    1. Hi Marianne, wooden candlestick maybe too light to carry the waterdrop part. Instead of a candle stick and a short nipple pipe, you can use a longer pipe and slide that long pipe over a rebar staked in the ground. Or if you already made the candlestick, then you can drill the bottom of it and slide that over a rebar staked in the ground. And as another option, you can use a lamp base instead of a candlestick which would be generally heavier, so it would solve the tipping over problem.

      1. Thanks Handan. I’m going to try drilling a hole in the base and putting it on rebar in the ground. I think it will work…great project. Can’t wait to see it finished.

  55. HELP! I’m stuck. Attempting to get lights through hose bib but not working. I’ve tried screwing handle stem one way & then the other. I’m so frustrated. Can you suggest an easier way to get these lights threaded?

    1. Hi Karen, I’m afraid with that part of the project there is not much I can do to help. I know it’s tricky, but if you keep at it you should be able to get the wire through. Best of luck!

  56. I love this whimsical garden feature! I will begin the β€œhunt” for supplies. My question to you is how do you keep the display from toppling over? Is it secured in ground with a stake? What keeps it in place with a fierce wind?

    1. Thank you so much, Micki! I indeed don’t do anything special to keep them from falling over. The tapered candle holders I have are heavy enough to keep the whole thing standing up. Also the (black pipe) nipple fits perfectly into the tapered candle holders. Hence the top part has no place to move.
      If the place you live is very windy you might want to try ground stakes: in other words, instead of using a black pipe nipple and candle stick, just use a 12 inch or 18 inch black pipe and make your lights like that. Then once you finish your lights, just hammer a small rebar or stake into the ground, and slide the black pipe onto that rebar/stake. That way no wind could hurt your lights. πŸ™‚

  57. I LOVE these β€œfaucet” solar light!!! I definitely want to make some because it doesn’t call for any tools per se. You two are pretty smart.

  58. My sister-in-law originally showed me this project and said we could make her one. I remembered it and we did just that for Christmas. We used a brass lamp base and it turned out great. She was so surprised and she loved it. It cost us about $38.00 Your directions are so easy to follow. I also love the HO HO HO signs, but don’t have access to the 5 inch hole saw.

    1. Oh that’s awesome – thank you so much, Cathleen! I’m so glad you liked the tutorial. As for the 5 inch hole saw, they sell those as drill bits. So if you have a drill at home, here are some pretty affordable saw drill bits you can find: https://amzn.to/2s0ivc1 and https://amzn.to/2s2sNbQ Also if you decide to do the HO Ho HO signs with hand drill, be sure to clamp the piece securely as the saw drill bit will want to pull it out of your hand.

  59. Hi. I absolutely LOVE this idea!!! I am redoing my garden area and definitely want to do this for my new space!! Could you please send me the printable instructions? I’m sorry for asking. I keep trying to print but for some reason it just won’t do it from your page. My memory isn’t great at my age, and I need the instructions to make sure I get it perfect like yours! Thank you for such a brilliant idea!

    1. Hi Dianne, sure that would work! Instead of using a candle holder or lamp base, just use a longer pipe to connect the hose bib. Then stick a rebar into the ground and slide the pipe over the rebar. πŸ˜‰

  60. This is brilliant! Who knows you can turn watering globes into something beautiful like this, I think it serves it’s purpose more as a light accessory than a vase. I don’t think a plant can survive in there either. Thanks for showing a step-by-step guide, I’m so sold with the idea that I’m going to buy one and try building it. This waterdrop solar lights is definitely a conversation piece!

  61. beautifull offers for solar lights and provides you the best place to buy garden lights and solar decoration lights and fairy lights online at dealer price…#solargardenlights #outdoorlighting #solarledlightsforhomes

  62. when did you paint the pipe or does it matter? also anyone using the black pipe from the store needs to make sure that they wipe it clean of the black stuff as it is there to keep the pipe from rusting but will cause bumps if you don’t wipe clean before painting. you can use rubbing alcohol or paint thinner etc. why did you remove the black pad from the hose bib? I had 4 of these globes lying around and found 3 candle holders at the Goodwill for $8.00 total. they look exactly like what your picture shows and are very heavy. I can’t wait to make these!!

    1. Hi Fran, I’m not sure how I missed your comment, but here are the answers:
      -When you paint the pipe doesn’t matter. I did it after attaching the globe on it, but surely can be done before.
      -I removed the black pad to make the string light pass easier. The less obstacles in the way, the easier it is to get the string light through.
      I’m glad you’ll be giving this a try – I’m sure you’ll love it!!

  63. Very Beautiful would love to make a few for the Senior home. Could you send me the instruction
    please. Thank you

  64. Very very beautiful. love it How do you get all the lights into the bottom of the water globe. once it reaches the bottom I had difficulty pushing it further in especially the spout. Do the globe comes in different sizes? I had mine years now. Your help will be greatly appreciated. I had to go another way with mine. I will post a pic once its complete. Thank you

    1. I was also curious as to how you got the lights into the watering globe. Did you wrap the string around the dowel and slowly shove it in..’or? I’m having a hard time lol thank you!

      1. Hi Jessica, we shoved as many in by hand as we could, and for the rest, we wrapped the lights around a dowel, slid the coils off the dowel and then used the dowel to push the coils into the globe. There’s a section in the post with pics of this process! πŸ™‚

  65. Pretty cool project! I have one suggestion, though. Drill a hole through the cup of the candle holder and a hold through the base, and thread the lights up so that the cord is inside where it won’t show. Put a bit of hot glue or whatever to hold it in place, and then assemble as you did. Also, for the pouring/dripping lights, they would look cool puddling over a porch rail or down some stairs.

    Regardless, great post, thanks.

  66. These are so beautiful. I do have none question. You show securing a cord to the candlestick but I thought these were solar lights. Am I missing something?

    1. Thank you, Tracy! They are solar. The solar panel has a cord that attached to the light, so they can be placed apart from one another.

  67. I love your ideas and creativity. I myself like to be creative. You have wonderful ideas, that I plan to use in my garden.

  68. Love this and I will dig out my watering globe and make one!! Question: where did you place the solar collector?
    Idea: Because we receive so much rain I will drill a couple of holes in the part where the pipe will go so it does not collect rain!

    1. Hi Cathy, our solar collector had a long wire, so we were able to place it away from the globe. Good idea for drainage! πŸ™‚

  69. These are beautiful and I absolutely love them! I have several of the watering globes, I’m going to make them. I’m also going to start following your blog. I have “chingaderos”, as The Hubs calls the stuff I never get rid of. We recently took down 27+ wooden blinds to make room for new windows. I kept all the wooden slats. Any ideas?
    Much love,
    Connie