DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com

DIY Wood Dowel Planter

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A wood dowel planter is a simple and stunning coffee can repurpose project. We’ll show you how to make two with different size dowels.

DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com

For years, we were swimming in them. You couldn’t take a step in our old basement without kicking an empty coffee can. For years, Handan brought home every single empty can of Chock full o’Nuts from her office. I dreaded the evenings she’d arrive home with yet another black and yellow can.

It’d be one thing if we were cornering the aluminum market for a reason. Like, I don’t know, she intended to melt them all down and build a life-size replica of the Eifel Tower from aluminum or something like that.

But, no, every time I asked about their purpose I was told that she would think of something…eventually. And every time I hinted around the possibility of perhaps lightening the load by, oh, I don’t know, recycling some of them, I was blasted by The Look.

You know the one.

DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com

We had enough aluminum in the basement that there were really only two possibilities: either my babes planned on starting a canned soup empire to rival Campbell’s or she intended for me to build her a jumbo jet so we could go toe-to-toe with Airbus and Boeing.

The thought of being a titan of the aviation industry did have a certain appeal, but then I remembered I could barely make a folded piece of paper stay afloat for more than a few seconds, so an entire jet seemed a little above my pay grade.

I was able to lighten the load here and there by using some cans for bacon grease or motor oil or various other nasty things that would require a trip to the dump instead of a cleaning, but we always had more than I knew what to do with.

But then one day, salvation!

DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com

When we embarked upon our craft room makeover in the old house, Handan conscripted many of those old coffee cans into service as craft-supply containers. But first, we gave them makeovers.

Finally, the horde of cans had been defeated. I paid no mind to the odd empty can I found here and there. Without their army, they were nothing.

Fast forward two years, and empty coffee cans had all but been erased from my memory. Handan had been working from home, and I got my beans from a bag. We had settled into a beautiful canless routine, and I loved it.

But glass was made to be shattered.

The other day I was peacefully minding my own business when a shrieking klaxon my babes’ sweet voice pierced my serenity.

“Hey Babes! Do we have any empty coffee cans?” she said.

DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com

Coffee cans.

My blood ran cold.

Crap. I couldn’t remember if I moved any coffee cans from Connecticut to Georgia. I mean, why would I, right?

Right??

Double crap! What if I threw the remaining cans in the dumpster before moving?

Gah!

“Ummmm, yeah, we might! Why?” I said, stalling.

“Oh, you’re going to make me some planters from coffee cans and wood dowels,” she said. “I saw it on Pinterest!”

Pinterest. The sworn enemy of husbands everywhere. A recent study by a Team of Important Scientists found that the rise of Pinterest has resulted in an 84% decline in sofa-time and loafing-around for the average American husband.

It’s terrifying and awful to think about.

DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com

Back to the cans – she’d have my guts for garters if she found out I threw away perfectly good crafting supplies!

In a panic, I ran to the basement, pulled out my phone and dialed my buddy Manoj who lived a few houses up the road.

“Manoj!” I whisper-screamed. “Do you have any empty coffee cans?”

Manoj is like the mayor of this subdivision. He knows everyone. I hoped that if he didn’t have one, he’d be able to track down someone who did.

“Hmmmm,” he said, “I might have one somewhere. I’ll also call Jerry to see if he has any. I’ll get back to you.”

Five minutes later, our doorbell rang. I ran to answer, and there stood Manoj with two empty cans – one Chock full o’Nuts and a larger can that once held Maxwell House.

“Manoj, you’re a life-saver!” I said, reaching for the cans.

“Who was at the door?” Handan said, as I walked back in the kitchen.

“Hmmmm? Oh. Jehovah’s Witness,” I said as I held out my hands. “Here are the cans!”

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DIY Wood Dowel Planters

DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com

How to make a wood dowel planter

When it came to dowel size, my babes and I had a bit of a disagreement. She wanted to use 1/4 inch square dowels, but I was leaning towards 1/2 inch. In the end, we bought both. Two coffee cans, two wood dowel planters, right? We used a different technique for each planter, and I’ll show you both below. But each one started off the same – peeling off the coffee label and spray painting the can black – inside and out.

While the paint dried, I cut the dowels for each planter. I used the 1/4 inch dowels on the smaller of the two cans and the 1/2 inch dowels for the bigger one. We planned on each planter having 3 legs, each leg consisting of 2 dowels for the large-dowel planter and 3 dowels for the small-dowel planter.

For each planter, I cut the dowels about 1/8 inch longer than the height of the can. This was to make sure the dowels completely covered and none of the can would show, especially around the bottom. For the larger can, i cut the dowels to 6 inches. For the smaller can, I cut them to 5 1/2 inches.

I determined leg height somewhat arbitrarily and ended up cutting them down after I made each planter. To make your job easier and remove the guesswork, I ended up with 4 inch legs on the bigger planter (10 inches overall) and 2 inch legs on the smaller one (7 1/2 inches overall).

As for the number of dowels needed, it will depend on the circumference of your coffee can. Our planter made with large dowels needed 38 dowels (including the legs). Unfortunately, the math didn’t work out perfectly for the one, so the spacing was 2-11-2-11-2-10 . But that’s okay, because you can’t at all tell there’s a missing dowel!

The smaller planter made with the 1/4 inch dowels took exactly 75 dowels, spaced 3-22-3-22-3-22.

When all the dowels were measured and cut, I handed them over to Baris to stain with Minwax Special Walnut.

Method 1

This method works best for the larger 1/2 inch dowels.

wood dowels and a black painted coffee can on a table

Here’s a little video I put together of the process to show you how easy it is.

The method is simple – just run a line of hot glue down one of the dowels.

man putting hot glue on a wood dowel

I don’t know about your hot glue gun, but our old Stanley isn’t satisfied with just melting the glue. It likes to boil it!

line of hot glue on a wood dowel

Then press the dowel against the can. I worked with the can upside down. This ensured that the tops of the dowels were all level.

pressing a wood dowel against a coffee can
pressing a wood dowel against a coffee can

And that’s it for the technique. I repeated the process until I filled up the can.

DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com

Method 2

supplies to make a wood dowel planter

I made the 1/4 inch dowel planter in a slightly different manner. Instead of individually gluing each dowel to the coffee can, I first glued them onto a strip of burlap.

I clamped a scrap piece of plywood as a guide to keep the dowels straight.

gluing wood dowels onto burlap
gluing wood dowels onto burlap

Here’s the whole lineup ready for the can.

wood dowels glued to burlap

Once all the dowels were glued onto the burlap, I wrapped the burlap around the can to check the fit.

DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com
wrapping dowels around a coffee can

It was a perfect fit. Time to glue! I put a thick line of hot glue on one edge of the burlap.

gluing dowels on a coffee can

Then I pressed that area against the can. As with the larger planter, I worked with the can upside down.

gluing dowels on a coffee can

I added more hot glue and pressed.

gluing dowels on a coffee can
gluing dowels on a coffee can

I kept working around the can in this manner until I had the whole burlap strip glued down.

gluing dowels on a coffee can

Though we didn’t try to glue the 1/4 inch dowels on individually, this burlap trick seems a lot easier!

DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com

We love these planters! So simple, but so beautiful!

DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com

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DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Wood Dowel Planter - TheNavagePatch.com
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28 Comments

  1. Praying for your health, Handan now knows you did not save her cans. I happen to agree with her coffee cans are not as easy to acquire as in the past. Love the planters. Gotta try it as soon as I can get a can

  2. Actual coffee cans made from a metal??? You threw them away??? They are so hard to find – most coffee comes in plastic containers!! The small ones appropriate for storing bacon grease are especially difficult to locate!! You got so lucky that you could locate 2 of them…what will you do if Handan wants more planters?? Love the planters and the hint to use the burlap strip to make application to the can easier.

    1. Okay, now wait just a minute, Susan. I said I may have thrown them away, which implies that I may not have! No one knows what happened during those dark months of early 2020. It is lost to history, and I’m afraid we’ll just never know! πŸ˜†

  3. Great project and I look forward to making some of these planters, but I’m skeptical of finding metal coffee cans. I think I might have to scavenge some of the larger canned vegetable and soup cans. Can you share your source for the artificial plants? They are much nicer quality than I’ve found at the craft store here.

    1. Thank you, Deborah! I’ll have Handan chime in with our faux plant sources. We get them from a few different places, and yes – they look so real! πŸ™‚

  4. OMGosh, these are awesome!! I am thinking some cheap planters with straight sides may work as well (all of our coffee comes from a bag around here). I am thinking a grey stain will look awesome in kinda weathered-cedar way.

    Thanks for the inspiration!

  5. Awesome project; easy, affordable and they look totally fab! Thanks for sharing.

    I am curious though: why spray paint the cans if they will be wrap-covered?

    Bea:)

    1. Thanks, Bea! We painted the can first just in case there might be small gaps between the dowels and also so that it looks decent from the top and bottom.

  6. These look really nice — great idea!
    One caveat, though: I wouldn’t put “real” plants in them, as the cans will rust inside with watering. The rust might not be good for the plant(s). To avoid this, if someone wanted to use them with real plants, perhaps spraying the inside of the can with Plasti Dip or Flex Seal Spray (as mentioned in your 8/5/19 post) might make them water-tight enough… Just a thought.

    1. It sure is, Rhondee! That is an old Stanley glue gun we bought back in 2013 or 2014. Unfortunately, that model is discontinue, otherwise we’d be recommending it every chance we get. We’ve tried a few other full-size glue guns, but none has yet to perform as well as our old Stanley. I will keep buying new brands to try though – there must be one out there that compares. And when we find it, we’ll be recommending it in every post!

  7. Great project! Did you never donate two to the cause and make “stilts” for Baris out of 2 cans with holes punched in them with strings for him to hold and have him be 8″ taller than he was? And leave round footprints all over the neighborhood and make annoying clip clopping noises? Anyway, glad you put him to work; he’ll be a woman’s treasure some day putting up shelves, hanging curtain rods, etc.!

  8. Ok, this is exactly what I call serendipity! Just this weekend, I washed a beautiful metal can (large like yours) and it has a plastic lid. who needs the lid anyway? lol. My can is from Virginia Peanuts (lightly salted) from Costco. @Handan, that’s how you can get more cans for Greg to work on. I am thrilled I kept it as I figured I’ll use it in craft room or think of something. And here is your brilliant idea! Well, we will be moving to a bigger home in a few weeks and I hope to get to this project then. Thanks for the awesome laughs and inspiration as always!

    1. Hi Rupa, well that is serendipitous! Congrats on the new house, and I will now be keeping an eye out at Costo for metal cans!

  9. err…..this just occurred to me now! Handan wants to possibly turn YOU (Greg!) into Halloween decoration..hmmmm. That sounds a bit scary like she’ll turn you into a ghost or hang you over the door or something, in a costume to boot? lol. Watch your back buddy!

  10. My grocery store sells smaller coffee cans but I’m not sure I like the coffee. May have to get the neighborhood involved. πŸ™‚