DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) - TheNavagePatch.com

DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe)

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Learn how to make these DIY terracotta pumpkins using Dollar Tree pumpkins for a simple & gorgeous Pottery Barn dupe!

You can’t flip open a smartphone these days without running across them. They’re pretty much everywhere, and every smiling Suzy Sawhorse on Instagram and Debbie Do It on TikTok is making them and proclaiming them to be “just the cutest thing EVER!” In fact, (they’re quick to inform) they’re also “super easy, super fun, super cheap,” and pretty much all-around SUPER! And would you believe that each and every one of them was just “so excited to share this with you?”

DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com

Well, madam, something this monumentally super deserves a glance from Handan and me here at the little old Navage Patch.

I’m talking, of course, about those Pottery Barn terracotta pumpkins that have half the internet all hot and bothered and the other half scratching their heads wondering what the big fu@%in’ deal is.

DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com

In case you’ve been vacationing on the dark side of the moon for the past month, these are the pumpkins that started the all the fuss.

DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com
Source: Potterybarn.com

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You should all know by now how much my babes loves a good dupe, and these terracotta pumpkins were easy prey.

We’re generally not trend-jumpers, but this one was just too easy not to share, because it’s pretty amazing how good you can make a Dollar Tree pumpkin look (or any other plastic pumpkin) with just a few simple ingredients.

DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com

DIY Terracotta Pumpkin SUPPLIES LIST

Affiliate links are provided below. Full disclosure here.

  • Chip Brushes
  • Plastic pumpkins or Jack-O-Lanterns
  • Orange matte paint (Behr color code given in post)
  • Pale yellow matte paint (Behr color code given in post)
  • Baking Soda
  • Flour
  • Spray fixatif
DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com

DIY Terracotta Pumpkin Tutorial

Step 1 – Mix up the perfect paint

My babes spent hours in the lab reverse engineering the exact color used by Pottery Barn, and she nailed it right on its pale pumpkin head!

If you want your pumpkins to have the perfect sun-kissed terracotta look of the Pottery Barn originals, you’ll need to head to your nearest Home Depot with the following two paint codes:

Mix the colors using 1.5 parts orange for every 1 part yellow.

Stir in baking soda until you have a thick paint. For more on this baking soda painting technique, please see my Faux Stone Vase post and my Faux Stone Pedestal Tray posts.

The difference in painting technique is that here I brushed long vertical strokes with the thickened paint instead of stabbing the brush to get a rough stone look.

Step 2 – Paint!

This part is easy peasy pumpkin squeezy – just glop that sh!t on there and start brushing up and down!

I’ll be showing you how to make terracotta pumpkins with this lumpy fellow from Lowe’s. We also terracottafied pumpkins from Dollar Tree and a candy pail from Walmart.

Before we begin, I’d like to take you behind the scenes of a Navage Patch craft video shoot for a moment. My camera(wo)man is also the director, coach, kibbitzer-in-chief and stylist of The Talent (aka Yours Sufferingly).

man holding plastic pumpkin

Shortly after starting this shoot, the stylist decided my hair was just too cockatiel, so she fixed it on the fly…all while filming.

man getting hair fixed
Yes, dear

With my hair now fully-functioning, I got back to the matter at hand – painting my pumpkin. I slapped the paint on thick and brushed up and down.

By the way, if you want this exact pumpkin, you can find him here. Act fast, because they will run out!

man painting a plastic pumpkin

Even though I thickened the paint, it still would want to level itself if left unattended.

man painting a plastic pumpkin

After coating the entire pumpkin, I let it sit for a few minutes (how long you let it rest depends on how thick you made it, temperature, humidity, nearby fans, etc), and then I went back and continued the with the vertical brush strokes.

man painting a pumpkin

As the paint starts to dry, the brush strokes will remain and add beautiful texture to your terracotta pumpkin.

man painting a pumpkin

Step 3 – Add flour

After reaching the texture I wanted, the paint was already getting dry. This is the perfect time to add flour. Yes, flour. First person to make a pumpkin bread joke gets 50 lashes with a wet noodle.

I sprinkled a couple of handfuls over the top and around the sides.

man sprinkling flour on a painted pumpkin

Then I brushed it lightly with a clean chip brush.

man brushing flour onto a painted pumpkin

To get flour onto the bottom half, I flipped up the excess on the lazy susan with the brush.

man flouring a pumpkin

How much flour you brush off or leave on is up to you, but we think they look best with most brushed off – that still leaves you with a beautiful faux terracotta pumpkin. But we also liked the look of having some heavier-floured areas on some pumpkins.

Now, with all this flour, we’re going to need to seal it in, otherwise it’s going to rub off with every touch.

Step 4 – Seal (sorta)

Okay, first the truth. Anyone out there claiming they sealed it with clear matte acrylic sealer is completely full of sh!t. We tried it, and the sealer entirely erases the flour. Entirely.

Fortunately, we never throw things away, so I had some fixatif left over from my art days back in the mid 90s. Fixatif is meant to be sprayed on charcoal, pencil and pastel drawings. It sets those media in place so an errant brush with a hand or piece of clothing won’t smudge, smear or send half the artwork spilling off the page. It sets, but it does so gently, so that the drawing can be re-worked at a later date, if needed. Fixatif is not nearly as strong as acrylic sealant, but it did the trick for these terracotta pumpkins.

I gave each pumpkin a couple of light coats of fixatif, and I gave the ones with heavier areas of flour a couple more coats after that. Fixatif dries quickly, and I was able to recoat after a few minutes.

man spraying terracotta pumpkins with fixatif

Now, smart madams such as yourself are probably thinking, “but couldn’t you use acrylic sealer after the fixatif? That would work, wouldn’t it?” It is an excellent question and one we thought of and tested ourselves. Unfortunately, the results were sub-optimal for both Rustoleum matte acrylic sealant and Mod Podge matte acrylic sealant.

First, the Rustoleum. After fixatif, I sprayed half of this skull with Rustoleum. Here is the unsprayed side:

man holding painted skull

And the sprayed side. Only the thickest areas of flour remain.

man holding painted skull

And here’s the Mod Podge acrylic sealant. First the unsprayed side:

man holding pumpkin

And the sprayed side:

man holding pumpkin

Final thoughts on sealant. Fixatif is best, and I like it on its own. But if I had to follow up with a traditional acrylic sealant, I’d go with Mod Podge – it seemed to leave more flour than Rustoleum.

Okay, enough blabbing, let’s get on with the beauty shots!

DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com

Just look that incredible texture! Unless you’re holding it in your hands, you wouldn’t guess these are faux terracotta.

DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com
DIY Terracotta Pumpkins (Pottery Barn Dupe) | How to make viral terracotta pumpkins - TheNavagePatch.com




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40 Comments

  1. You guys always go 1 step further than I would have thought of. You took a skull and terra coated it. What’s next, terra coated spiders and snakes??? Great job as usual.

  2. Here’s me — over here, scratching my head (in the second group of readers) yeah, I don’t get it. And flour ?? Mmmmm no. However, you two are the BEST Dupers, in which case it’s safe to call you and Handan Super Dupers…. That’s worthy of the 50 wet noodle lashes, but now that you mention it, pumpkin bread sounds pretty good….. you lovin’ Florida ?? Still not sayin’ ya’ll. 🧡

      1. I should have clarified my “ya’ll” comment…..if it slips out, which happens on occasion (like a vile curse word) I pretend like it didn’t….just move on quickly….however, more dangerous than “ya’ll” (which, let’s face it, those aforementioned “Suzy &Debbie” influencers have mainstreamed “ya’ll” into a nationwide colloquialism) is the “fix-in to” — BEWARE of the “fix-in to” it can slide right in without fanfare….when I talk to my New England peeps, they brutally point out my unintended south of the Mason Dixon line conversion….and it’s wicked embarrassing. God Save The King. 🤍🤍. PS. I do love the SKULLyou created. 🤍🤍🤍

  3. After shopping every $ tree within a mapquest distance to find the gnome garland ghost and hat, I’m just going to ask “Where did you find your pumpkins to “jack” up? and the skull. Half of the success is the shapes of the pumpkins, don’t you agree? Thanks for all the great ideas.
    cecelia

      1. What about the 3 stacked pumpkins? Did you attach those together or buy them like that? Thanks for all the ideas! You guys are great at DIY!

  4. Not really into the Terra cotta look (or feel for that matter) but that setup looks really good! No one will ever know. 😉😉 As Nancy said, please do tell where you got that large, wonky pumpkin! Inquiring minds want to know!

  5. Nicely done! Makes me want to go shopping. Again. Sigh.
    Have you made a haunted house out of a doll house? If not, I would like to see you do one. I have a Barbie Dream House that I just started working on. Would love to see what you do with one.

  6. Absolutely obsessed. Forcing my sisters-in-law to come over and have a pre-Halloween party and make these. Do you think I could use a foam pumpkin? Or should I stick with plastic?

      1. Can’t wait! Found tons of good pumpkins and Jack-o-lanterns. Also found a little dollar tree skeleton that I’m going to attempt! I’ll show you a picture of it in the wild 😂

  7. I just looked at this post this morning. Fabulous job as always. Wanted to let you know the link in my email sent me to the chandelier post, which was awesome too. Thanks for all the creative ideas you throw our way!

    1. Sorry let me clarify. When I clicked on the “read more” part, it sent me to the chandelier post. That’s what I usually do. The link that says “click here to read the blog post” does send you to the pumpkin post. Sorry for the confusion. Really do appreciate all the hard work you guys put into your blog.

  8. Got a question…..First, I love this craft, heck, I love ALL your crafts…but….worried about using flour for the simple reason BUGS! When in storage, wouldn’t certain bugs be attracted to the flour? I live in SE Oklahoma (aka: Bug Capital of The World! No, seriously!! We have a zillion bugs at any given time! Terrible!) So, do you think something like Plaster of Paris would work or chalk dust maybe???

    1. Yes, Sheila, P of P or chalk could work as an alternative. But since the flour is set with fixatif, I don’t think it would be a problem for bugs. But if it is a concern, then by all means use an alternative. Better safe than sorry!

  9. Love these! Actually have some I bought many years ago that were from a Dollar Tree type store. I didn’t have to do anything to them (probably from the late 90s or early 2000s). They’re a little lighter in color than yours, but if I make more I will definitely use your technique. As a graphic design major in college Fixatif was always around ready for use. I still keep a can around to this day. It can’t be beat for many craft applications. I do a lot of paper crafts and it’s great for “setting” the ink on printables I want to cover with Mod Podge without them bleeding excessively. Great stuff!

  10. My natural inclination is to put everything either outside or put a plant in it…so I’m trying to think of ways to get that floured look to hold up. The problem of course is that if it’s just sprayed, most things (like the flour) just dissolves into a liquid, and of course without any sealer it would just come off. I’m thinking either PP, maybe even white cement…? And then seal that? If we lived like…at all close…I can imagine the horrible experiments that would take place on innocent pumpkins.

  11. Great instructional. I was thinking that if some of us would rather make than buy the pumpkins because they can get pricey, I would try to make with paper mache’. Might work out just as well and I am a bit nervous about the flour use because of insects etc even though fixative is used. Thinking talcum/dusting powder with the use of a mask might give the same effect. Thank you again for sharing your ideas 🙂